Coastal Area-capability Enhancement in Southeast Asia

  1. D-05
  2. FS①
  3. FS②
  4. FS③
  5. FR①
  6. FR②
  7. FR③
  8. FR④
  9. FR⑤

2016

PL Photo Project Leader

ISHIKAWA Satoshi

RIHN

Satoshi Ishikawa investigates population genetics and population dynamics of aquatic animals, and has participated in several rural development programs focused on improving fisheries and human capacity building in Southeast Asia. His current interest is how to harmonize conservation of coastal ecosystems and community-based management of fisheries resources. He received his baccalaureate from the National Fisheries University Japan, M.A. from Hiroshima University, and doctoral degree from the University of Tokyo.

Sub-Leader
WATANABE Kazuo RIHN Senior Project Researcher
Project Researchers at RIHN
HONMA Saki Project Research Associate
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Main Project Members
KONO YasuyukiKyoto University
KUROKURA HisashiThe University of Tokyo
ARIMOTO TakafumiTokyo University of Marine Science and Technology
MIYAMOTO YoshinoriTokyo University of Marine Science and Technology
MIYATA TsutomuNational Research Institute of Fisheries Science
YAMADA YoshihikoTokai University
YOSHIKAWA TakashiTokai University
MUTO FumihitoTokai University
KAWADA MakitoSeijo University
EBATA KeigoKagoshima University
MOTOMURA HiroyukiKagoshima University Museum
MANAJIT, NoppornSoutheast Asian Fisheries Development Center
ALTAMIRANO, Jon P.Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
TUNKIJJANUKIJ, SuriyanKasetsart University, Thailand
KAEWNERN, MetheeKasetsart University, Thailand
BOUTSON, AnukornKasetsart University, Thailand
BABARAN, RicardoUniversity of the Philippines Visayas
FERRER, Alice J. G.University of the Philippines Visayas
TIROL, Yasmin P.Aklan State University, Philippines

Background

Figure 1 Research sites and characters of each area

Figure 1 Research sites and characters of each area

Coastal area ecosystem services are indispensable for rural people, but are also easily damaged by human use. Many coastal areas with high biodiversity and biological productivity are located in tropical zones of developing countries, as is the case in Southeast Asia. In such areas, ecosystem services, local livelihood and culture are closely related. Conservation and resource management strategies, however, are often derived from those of temperate regions, and usually target particular species or commercial resources with little consideration of how multiple ecologies and livelihood strategies overlap in culturally diverse contexts. In addition, in many cases, resource management and conservation activity are individually conducted by several different actors.

Ecosystem services have different significance for different peoples, depending on their interests and contexts. Although overuse and/or abuse of ecosystem services should be avoided, conservation actions should take careful account of the close relationship of local livelihoods and culture to local ecosystems, especially in rural areas lacking other livelihood opportunities. Addressing solutions to environmental problems in such contexts therefore requires linking people and policies engaged in both conservation and resource utilization.

This project attempts to examine several good ecosystem management practices based on local community participation in order to assess the conditions and functions of each actor in creating “Area-capability”. We expect that an action contributing to Area-capability can link utilization and conservation and facilitate appropriate ecosystem utilizations, improve local life, cultivate ecosystem health, and foster hope for local society.

Project Framework

In Nishio City and Ishigaki Island in Japan, environmental education links several actors having different jobs and interests in new utilization and conservation activities. Around Hamana Lake (Japan), stock enhancement of Kuruma shrimp enhanced social capital among seven villages, facilitated smart fishery management, and stimulated fishermen to care for ecosystems. In Rayong, Thailand, a new community of fishermen was created based on set-net fishery installation, and they collected detailed fishery data and promoted zoning of fishing ground. In Batan Bay, Philippines, shrimp stock enhancement increased local peoples’ interest in ecosystem health. Project research conducts field surveys in these areas to collect detailed data and information about social and environmental changes regarding each event. Scientific and social analyses are conducted in order to examine the impacts of each event on both ecosystem health and quality of life. Further, we collaborate with key stakeholders, including local communities, governments and scientists, in order to identify key factors and conditions for local community-based ecosystem management and rural development, examining the functions of each actor in the transformation of society.

This project is based on the joint research efforts of Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC), Eastern Marine Fisheries Research and Development Center of Department Fishery, Thailand, Faculty of Fisheries of Kasetsart University, the University of the Philippines, Visayas (UPV), Aklan State University, and researchers from ten universities and one research organization in Japan.

Figure 2 Conceptual model of the “Area-capability Cycle”

Figure 2 Conceptual model of the “Area-capability Cycle”

Figure 3 AC Cycle for shrimp stock enhancement in Hamana Lake, Japan

Figure 3 AC Cycle for shrimp stock enhancement in Hamana Lake, Japan

Figure 4 AC Cycle for a set-net fishery in Rayong, Thailand.<br />The AC Cycle suggests there is weakness in the impact survey on environments. Researchers should therefore try to conduct an impact survey with the local community, and its results taken into account by the set-net fishery operation. The AC Cycle should further clarify other improvements as well.

Figure 4 AC Cycle for a set-net fishery in Rayong, Thailand.
The AC Cycle suggests there is weakness in the impact survey on environments. Researchers should therefore try to conduct an impact survey with the local community, and its results taken into account by the set-net fishery operation. The AC Cycle should further clarify other improvements as well.

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Future tasks

The Area-capability (AC) Cycle was proposed as one model of sequential change in harmonization of natural resource conservation and management. The AC Cycle would be comprised of: (1) Local community use of resources unique to the region; (2) Resource users understanding of the importance of, and care for, the environment that supports the resources used; and (3) A balance is struck between using and caring for resources and the supporting environment, which is evaluated by outside entities.

Project research will apply the AC Cycle model to many cases in order to examine its validity and refine understanding of how to harmonize conservation and management of natural resources. We believe that the set of factors included in AC and the AC Cycle will be useful as a checklist when developing proposals for regional development and revitalization activities, assessing the balance between use and care, and clarifying the standpoint and role of each stakeholder when evaluating projects. As each AC Cycle corresponds to a resource used by a local community, we believe the number of AC Cycles can be an indicator of the abundance of local resources in a given region and, at the same time, an indicator of the potential for various types of cooperation. As such, we suggest that the number of AC Cycles could be used as an index for regional development.

Photo 1 Community-based set-net fishery in Rayong, Thailand

Photo 1 Community-based set-net fishery in Rayong, Thailand

Photo 2 Group photo of International Area-capability Workshop held at RIHN in December 2015

Photo 2 Group photo of International Area-capability Workshop held at RIHN in December 2015

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