Proposal and Verification of the Validity of Isotope Environmental Traceability Methodology in Environmental Studies

  1. FS
  2. FR①
  3. FR②
  4. FR③

2018

PL Photo Project Leader

TAYASU Ichiro

RIHN

Dr. TAYASU was Assistant Professor at RIHN (2002), Associate Professor at Kyoto University (2003), and is currently a Professor at RIHN (2014). His research focuses on isotope ecology and isotope environmental science.

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Researchers at RIHN
FUJIYOSHI LeiResearcher
Main Members
NAKANO TakanoriRIHN / Waseda University
SHIN Ki-CheolRIHN
YABUSAKI ShihoRIHN
KONDO YasuhisaRIHN
OKUDA NoboruRIHN
MCGREEVY, Steven R.RIHN
MORI SeiichiGifu Keizai University
YOKOO YorikoDoshisha University
YAMADA YoshihiroKagawa University
KAERIYAMA ToshiakiGratitude to the Water Foundation
TOKUMASU MinoruSaijo City Office
OOMORI NoboruOshino Village Office
OHKUSHI Ken’ichiKobe University
MITSUHASHI HiromuneUniversity of Hyogo / Museum of Nature and Human Activities, Hyogo
YOKOYAMA TadashiHyogo prefectural Ako School for Students with Special Needs

In this project, we investigate environmental traceability as a key concept needed to solve environmental issues for various stakeholders. Stable isotope ratios of elements, together with concentrations of elements, can trace the flow of matter and chemicals through the environment, better describe ecosystem structure and conditions, and appraise the chemical profiles of food products. Spatiotemporal variation of multiple isotope ratios can be used to study Earth systems operating at local to global scales. This information can serve an important decision-making tool for local people considering water, food and environmental security, all of which are fundamental for the sustainability of human society.

This study seeks to establish methodologies for the use of environmental traceability in environmental studies. A combination of quantitative and qualitative tools, including “Multi-Isoscapes”, (the use of multiple elements and isotope ratios together with GIS-based mapping techniques), social surveys, and workshops are deployed to investigate the role of environmental traceability in addressing environmental issues. We hypothesize that the role and perception of traceability methods in transdisciplinary processes will differ among stakeholders and that the co-production of “Multi-Isoscapes” can act as an effective bridging tool for understanding and explaining variation in local environments. The ultimate objective of this research is to demonstrate the effectiveness of multi-isotopic information in solving global environmental issues.

Project research tests (I) the effectiveness of the environmental traceability concept in environmental studies by comparing case studies in which isotopic methods were initiated by local government, citizen groups, and researchers; (II) the extent to which these different stakeholders hold different views of the concepts of food traceability and environmental traceability and the effectivity of these concepts in communicating links between food production and consumption. Field research is taking place in Japan at sites in Ono City, Fukui; Otsuchi Town, Iwate; Saijo City, Ehime; Oshino Village, Yamanashi; the Chikusa river watershed, Hyogo; Lake Biwa and surrounding watershed in Shiga; as well as in the Laguna de Bay and surrounding watershed in the Philippines.

Photo 1 Hongan-Shozu pond in Ono City, Fukui, recharged by ground water

Photo 1 Hongan-Shozu pond in Ono City, Fukui, recharged by ground water

Photo 2 A symposium held in Oshino Village, where we used a questionnaire for studying the effect of environmental traceability methodology

Photo 2 A symposium held in Oshino Village, where we used a questionnaire for studying the effect of environmental traceability methodology

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